Boflot (Puff-Puff)

 

Boflot (Puff-Puff)
5 from 6 votes
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Boflot

Its a popular West-African street food similar to donuts in other parts of the world. It's called Boflot in Ghana, Puff-Puff in Nigeria and Sierra Leone. 

Course Appetizer, Breakfast, Snack
Cuisine West African
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Servings 5 People
Calories 180 kcal

Ingredients

  • 4 CUPS Unbleached Flour
  • 2 Tbsp Dry Yeast
  • 2 Cups Lukewarm Water
  • 1 Cup Honey / Sugar I use honey
  • 1 Tbsp Salt
  • 1 Tsp Nutmeg

Instructions

  1. Boil two cups of water for a few minutes or until lukewarm and add the salt and a tbsp of honey then add the yeast. Let it sit between 5-10 minutes or until it reacts, it should grow in volume and become foamy.

  2. Pour the the flour in a big bowl and add the nutmeg.
  3.  Mix the flour and the yeast mix together and let it rise for about 45 minutes.
  4. Scoop them up with an ice cream scoop or roll them into a ball shape.
  5. Deep fry them about 5-10 minutes. Time to enjoy!

Recipe Notes

Earlier this year I learned how to make one of my favorite snacks growing up in Ghana called Boflot. I remember I used to have it for breakfast with some Koko (Corn porridge). or with a glass of hot chocolate preferably Milo. You can get them when you're downtown Accra and you need a quick snack to stave off your hunger. They can also be eaten as an appetizer before your main course at an African restaurant.

Its also made in Nigeria and Sierra Leone where its called Puff-puff. Its a little similar to donuts and actually there are a few British I know who call it donuts. 



Jollof Rice

 

5 from 7 votes
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Jollof Rice

Jollof Rice is a highly popular West African rice dish that is made out of rice, tomatoes/ tomato sauce, spices/herbs.

Course Side Dish
Cuisine West African
Prep Time 25 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 55 minutes
Servings 4 People
Calories 280 kcal

Ingredients

  • 3/4 Cup Cup Canola Oil
  • 4 Habanero Peppers You can use fewer or more depending on your tolerance level
  • 2 Cloves Garlic
  • 1.5 Cups Cups Tomato Paste You can also use fresh tomatoes or tomato sauce
  • 2 Cups Water
  • 1 Cube Cube Bouillon
  • 1 Tbsp Seaoned Salt
  • 5 Cups Basmati Rice
  • 5 Cups Chicken Stock / Broth You can add more if you like your rice softer or stickier
  • 1/4 Pound Ginger Blended
  • 1 Bulb Onion

Instructions

  1. First of all, warm up your oil in a saucepan for five minutes
  2. Add the onions and let it cook for about 5 minutes
  3. Add the blended garlic and ginger
  4. Add the tomato paste and 2 cups of water. Stir for a few minutes until the sauce is nice and smooth and let it simmer for about 15- 20 minutes.
  5. You can now include the Basmati Rice and let it cook for another 30 minutes. Cover the rice mix with a foil wrap with the saucepan lid over it. The foil traps the steam and allows it to cook a well and faster. Stir the mix every 5 - 10 minutes until cooked. Your world famous Jollof rice is ready!

Recipe Notes

Jollof Rice is a very popular West African dish that has sometimes sparked friendly arguments as to who makes the best Jollof Rice. Jollof rice originated from the Wolof, an ethnic group in parts of Senegal, the Gambia and Mauritania all on the West coast of Africa.
Sometime last week a popular food website posted a very diluted version of Jollof Rice which they claimed was Ghana Jollof which really angered a lot of Ghanaians and other West Africans. But my wife and I agreed that  getting angry wasn't the solution to combat that atrocity 🙂 but rather we needed to create a video showing a better version of Ghana Jollof Rice. So here you are and have a great week!

5 from 7 votes
Print

Jollof Rice

Jollof Rice is a highly popular West African rice dish that is made out of rice, tomatoes/ tomato sauce, spices/herbs.

Course Side Dish
Cuisine West African
Prep Time 25 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 55 minutes
Servings 4 people
Calories 275 kcal
Author fnonterah2018

Recipe Notes

Jollof Rice is a very popular West African dish that has sometimes sparked friendly arguments as to who makes the best Jollof Rice. Jollof rice originated from the Wolof, an ethnic group in parts of Senegal, the Gambia and Mauritania all on the West coast of Africa.
Sometime last week a popular food website posted a very diluted version of Jollof Rice which they claimed was Ghana Jollof which really angered a lot of Ghanaians and other West Africans. But my wife and I agreed that  getting angry wasn't the solution to combat that atrocity 🙂 but rather we needed to create a video showing a better version of Ghana Jollof Rice. So here you are and have a great week!